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Book meme

Gakked from viciouswishes

1. Choose five of your all time favorite books.
2. Take the first sentence of the first chapter and make a list in your journal.
3. Don't reveal the author or the title of the book.
4. Now everyone try and guess.

1) Abishag the Shunammite washes her hands, powders her arms, removes her robe, and approaches my bed to lie down on top of me. -- God Knows, by Joseph Heller
2) The Brangwens had lived for generations on the Marsh Farm, in the meadows where the Erewash twisted sluggishly through alder trees, separating Derbyshire from Nottinghamshire. -- The Rainbow, by D.H. Lawrence
3) At the age of fifteen my grandmother became the concubine of a warlord general, the police chief of a tenuous national government of China. -- Wild Swans, by Jung Chang; identified by anonypooh
4) My dear Mark,
Today I went to see my physician Hermogenes, who has just returned to the Villa from a rather long journey in Asia. -- Memoirs of Hadrian, by Marguerite Yourcenar
5) 'I have been here before,' I said; I had been there before; first with Sebastian more than twenty years ago on a cloudless day in June, when the ditches were creamy with meadowsweet and the air heavy with all the scents of summer; it was a day of peculiar splendour, and though I had been there so often, in so many moods, it was to that first visit that my heart returned on this, my latest. -- Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh; identified by meko00

I can't imagine my life without books. Ever since I first learned my letters at age 5, it has been my favourite pastime to read, something I'll enjoy doing any time, any place, anywhere. I always carry a book in my purse (currently, that would be Bill Bryson's Notes From A Big Country), and browsing through bookshops and libraries easily qualifies as the most satisfying time I can spend anywhere. Drop me in a strange town, and I'll check out the local bookshop before I'll go anywhere else...unless I run into an interesting-looking shoe shop first, of course.

I can never part with my books, either; and I hate having to lend them because so often, I don't get them back without having to nag the borrower for them, or I don't get them back at all. I know that eight years after having asked to borrow it, Timo still keeps possession of my copy of Susan Sontag's The Volcano Lover, and Chris still hasn't returned The Celestine Prophecy by James Redfield, and it's been more than a decade! (But that's okay, he can keep it; it was a load of tosh, anyway).

So when I go and see my Dad in the home that he is in, sometimes I look around me and I get scared that that'll be me in 30 years, living somewhere where there are no books, where there is no room for a bookcase in your private quarters, and where there's no intellectual stimulation of any kind. Really, I think I'd rather be dead.

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Comments

vegmb
Apr. 8th, 2005 04:25 pm (UTC)
I love to read. But I've found that with the husband and kids it is one of the hardest things to get to do. Everytime I curl up with a book they start asking me if I'm mad or come up with 200 questions for me to answer or things for me to do.

living somewhere where there are no books, where there is no room for a bookcase in your private quarters [shudders at the thought]
gamiila
Apr. 8th, 2005 04:43 pm (UTC)
Everytime I curl up with a book they start asking me if I'm mad or come up with 200 questions for me to answer or things for me to do.

My Mum's third marriage foundered on her husband's inability to let her be when she sat down with a book or a crossword of an evening...not saying that's what's going to happen to you, but -- I can see how having a family might interfere with an uninterrupted read!

living somewhere where there are no books, where there is no room for a bookcase in your private quarters [shudders at the thought]

Horrible thought, eh? It just doesn't bear thinking about.

I've asked the carers why there aren't any books, why they haven't got a small library or something. They tell me most people there don't want to read, or have never cared about reading, so there is no need to provide a service like that. Sounds really strange to me...
vegmb
Apr. 8th, 2005 04:53 pm (UTC)
Lately I've been reading more poetry and short stories. It's not the same as getting into a good long novel, but it's better than either not reading or being so aggrevated that I can't enjoy my book.

Sounds really strange to me...
Me too. Sounds like something they made up on the spot to try and pacify you. You would think there would at least be magizines around in the common areas. And the older generation would have been more apt to have entertained themselves with books, so it is odd that none of them brought any when they moved in and therefore needed a bookcase on which to store them.
gamiila
Apr. 8th, 2005 05:06 pm (UTC)
And the older generation would have been more apt to have entertained themselves with books,

Perhaps not necessarily -- in their day, reading really was more the preserve of the middle and upper classes; an honest, hard-working labourer wouldn't have had time for such foppishness; and their reading skills may not have been sufficient to enjoy a work of literature...but even so, I should think that -as you say- there should at least be magazines in the common areas, and perhaps some other form of light reading material as well.

My Dad now has a moving box with his books standing at the foot of his bed, and his newspaper is brought up to his room every morning, so he's not complaining. But for me, this wouldn't be enough.