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Views on office and UK politics

I hate how the developments in UK politics over the last 24 hours are wreaking havoc with my viewing habits. No EastEnders yesterday, and no Homes Under The Hammer this morning. Instead I was treated to an unchanging view of David Cameron's front door for an hour. Then my expat friend Allan rang to rage against Nick Clegg, "the betrayer", and how as a life-long Labour supporter he was now sure that Britain was "going to suffer" under an "Etonian PM" who is "clueless" and that the British public would never vote in favour of PR in an eventual referendum because Rupert Murdoch ("he's an Australian, you know") and The Sun would never let them; until I pointed out to him that he had no grounds for complaint since he'd thought it too much of a hassle to register to vote this time. Besides, a week or two ago, he said that if he had made sure he could, he would have voted LibDem this time, specifically because living in Europe had made him aware of the advantages of fixed term parliaments and PR, so what was his gripe exactly? After which he accused me of being a closet Conservative and put the phone down on me.

I am no closet Conservative. My political views, in The Netherlands and in Europe, swing to the left, and always have done. But I do think that now the Tories and the LibDems have got into bed together, they should be given a fair chance to make the experiment work. Coalition government is all about compromise, but as soon as either party thinks its being asked to go a compromise too far, it can break up the partnership and the country can go back to the ballot box and elect a new parliament, so why should the prevailing view of it in the UK be so negative? As inhabitant of a country where multi-party coalition government is the norm, I really can't see what all the fuss is about, to be honest.

I got a call from the CAD Business Controller last night, telling me how the CEO and the COO are still angry about The Biatch's actions in refusing me a permanent position. Well, if that's true, then why won't they do anything about it, I wonder? At the end of the conversation, I realised that I really couldn't care less anymore.

Comments

( 14 Speak Like A Child — Shout To The Top )
bogwitch
May. 12th, 2010 11:29 am (UTC)
You don't have to put up with Cameron's stupid smug face. I can't bear the thought that he's PM. I don't dare look at the TV in case I vomit.
gamiila
May. 12th, 2010 11:47 am (UTC)
He does look a bit pasty-faced, doesn't he? According to Wikipedia, he's a fifth cousin twice removed of your Queen; no offense but that family isn't reknowned for their good looks.
suze2000
May. 12th, 2010 12:20 pm (UTC)
I'm glad you have already reached a point of not caring about the old position. Though whether that's denial or acceptance I'll leave to you to figure out. :)

The ongoing dramas in Britain have once again made me feel smug about the Aussie electoral system. I love preference voting because it means that if my first choice guy doesn't get in, I can specify who my second choice guy is and my vote goes to him. I also like that we have compulsory voting. It forces people to make a decision, even if it's to hand in a blank ballot paper. We also vote on Saturdays, so people can get to the polling booths in plenty of time. And if you are away from home, you can turn up at any polling place, tell them who you are and where you come from, and STILL register your vote appropriately (I imagine this bit of wonder is due to the compulsory voting). In Britain, if you can't get to your ONE polling place, you can't vote. No wonder their voter turnout is crap and they feel unrepresented!

Anyway, that's my soapbox for the day. I'm disgusted that Clegg is in bed with the Tories, but really it's not my place to complain about it. Though hubby, who's English (and couldn't vote because they have lost his registration!) is really happy to be practically an Aussie now. :)

*sigh*

gamiila
May. 12th, 2010 01:19 pm (UTC)
I love preference voting because it means that if my first choice guy doesn't get in, I can specify who my second choice guy is and my vote goes to him.

That's a wonderful idea! I wish we had that option, the second choice if the first one fails to get in, as well...but at present we can only tick the box behind one of the hundreds of names on the ballot paper.

We're going to the polls next month, but I haven't made up my mind yet as to who or even what party (there's about 30 to choose from) to give my vote to. Whatever the outcome, I doubt we'll have a coalition formed as quickly as the Brits have; it usually takes about 6 weeks before inter-party negotiations are concluded and the Queen gets to confirm her new Cabinet members in their posts.

A few years ago, we too were given the chance to cast our votes at any polling station on presentation of our polling card and ID, and I think it has helped up voter turn-out; which had slumped after compulsory voting was scrapped in the 70s. Luckily, we don't have to register; if you're 18 or over and entitled, you automatically get 'called up' to vote, though it's up to you whether or not to make the effort to get to the polling station on the appointed day.
frelling_tralk
May. 12th, 2010 01:40 pm (UTC)
I really can't see what all the fuss is about, to be honest.

Word! People are mourning Labour not staying in power, even when they ran up a bill of £163 billion in just one year, and had no plans to start cutting public spending. I'm sorry, but we need a bit of real world sense here, and there's the Lib Dems to keep the conservatives in check so it's not going to be a repeat of the 80's like people are gloomily predicting

And it would have been totally undemocratic if Labour had held on to power, because the tories did get more votes then them at the end of the day

Edited at 2010-05-12 01:43 pm (UTC)
gamiila
May. 12th, 2010 05:15 pm (UTC)
there's the Lib Dems to keep the conservatives in check so it's not going to be a repeat of the 80's like people are gloomily predicting

I was baffled when I heard a commentator put the following non-question to a LibDem activist in an interview this morning: "You voted LibDem, you got Tory instead!" -- as if the coalition manifesto doesn't contain some major adjustments to the Tory election programme at all.

What is it with your political commentators? Are they there to report on the news, or foment a rebellion?
suze2000
May. 13th, 2010 04:41 am (UTC)
Foment a rebellion, for sure.
josephine_64
May. 12th, 2010 04:10 pm (UTC)
I was irritated last night - recording Stargate Universe and Sky kept putting banners up about how Gordon Brown had resigned and David Cameron was the new PM. I'm planning on keeping the recording, so that's just plain annoying! I mean, both were old news by the time they put the banner up. There's been a lot of coverage of front doors and BBC journalists interviewing each other lately. It's batty!

I'm with you on the idea of a coalition, though. But the British people are so used to swinging from one extreme to the other on a regular basis that they struggle with the idea that compromise would be a better idea. I just hope Clegg and Cameron can prove that coalitions can be a better idea.
gamiila
May. 12th, 2010 05:22 pm (UTC)
Ugh! I hate those banners, too. Do they think we're stupid or something, that we need telling the same bits of news over and over again before they sink in?

Since this coalition means both parties will now have a chance to make good on some of their election promises, I believe the compromise they've arrived at can only be beneficial to the country as a whole.
curiouswombat
May. 12th, 2010 05:33 pm (UTC)
Well, if that's true, then why won't they do anything about it, I wonder?
At the end of the conversation, I realised that I really couldn't care less anymore.


Yes - any more contact and point out 'We're sorry, she shouldn't have done that,' pays no bills, and the constant apologies without any action is going to put you off them pretty quickly, too.

They're all talk, by the sound of it - good luck with getting something at least as good quickly.

gamiila
May. 12th, 2010 07:04 pm (UTC)
good luck with getting something at least as good quickly

Fingers crossed for Friday, then!
meko00
May. 13th, 2010 04:00 pm (UTC)
Well, I've grown up in Sweden and hate the socialists with a burning passion, but to each their own.
kassto
May. 15th, 2010 07:49 am (UTC)
Agree with you about the politics in the UK. Have been watching it with great interest. And my view is that any party that has been in office for three terms needs to get chucked out — fresh faces, fresh energy, fresh ideas.
gamiila
May. 15th, 2010 10:07 am (UTC)
And my view is that any party that has been in office for three terms needs to get chucked out — fresh faces, fresh energy, fresh ideas.

Here, here! (or should that be 'hear, hear!'...I never can remember).
( 14 Speak Like A Child — Shout To The Top )

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